Sourcebook Aesthetic/Visual Inspiration

This is working towards the following objectives:

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

 

80s Fashion | A Decade of Trends by Danielle Muntyan

This magazine has been produced and published as a source book of 80s fashion trends and history.

Designed in mind for fashion students and fashionista’s, it contains everything you need to know about the influential decade; history, social issues, cultural changes and influential icons who shapes the fashion industry at the time.

96 pages / Perfect Bound / Matte Cover / Gloss Inners

Available at: http://daniellemuntyandesign.dunked.com/80s-fashion-a-decade-of-trends

889b3d24532239-56335e1503b66-2

7a0f8d24532239-56335c886afc5

95c1cc24532239-56335c8878d5b

97069624532239-56335c8887ef4

14ce1924532239-56335c889d723

b576c924532239-56335c88952ca

9f910f24532239-56335c8ec3338

25357424532239-56335c8ecbabf

424f9424532239-56335c8ed6251

57c6e724532239-56335c8ee1402

aacbfb24532239-56335c8ef2410

d7e4d924532239-56335c8f04a6f

3491b824532239-56335c8f0e075

a919c624532239-56335c8f17087

1c19d224532239-56335c8f1e6c3

8e0da624532239-56335d0a85ccb

be936724532239-56335d0a8a653

60170b24532239-56335d0a8f64d

cc538624532239-56335d0a948ed

d5f5f224532239-56335d0a995f5

ea290024532239-56335d2e40557

35fa8924532239-56335d2e48c6d

ce6d1624532239-56335d2e526d9

6c996724532239-56335d2e5bc46

d53c4824532239-56335d2e61a21

e4965824532239-56335d2e68373

9273f724532239-56335d2e754f1

2188c924532239-56335d2e81646

56402f24532239-56335d2e8e8b1

cb51bd24532239-56335d2e95166

df2b4924532239-56335d2e9c82c

d2280124532239-56335d2ea205e

eb6d8d24532239-56335d2ea66ab

2c695e24532239-56335d2eb33f6

8cab5424532239-56335d71ad249

2e9ac024532239-56335d7d3a2aa

c6c98524532239-56335da7d0f76

f2711b24532239-56335da7caf14

32ff7924532239-56335da8a7e84

28784d24532239-56335dd013c40

ec21b224532239-56335dd01fb33

f347e424532239-56335dd03add2

d8f38824532239-56335ddf919b5

6fdca024532239-56335dea8b1bc

4c034424532239-56335dfcc02e4

1c3e0f24532239-56335dfcc5154

161eb724532239-56335e14e5ecf

49f4b324532239-56335e14edd8d

Zuni Creates

A range of fashion digital and print-led collage and editorial works.

Available at: http://www.zukii.uk/company-magazine

img_0258

img_0268

img_0310

lotionspotions

screenshot2015-09-16at18-00-14

A-Collage

A range of socio-cultural led digital and print-led collages, hinting at identity issues and cultural confluence.

Available at: http://www.a-collage.com

11350669_902894803081093_2022630971_n

11375908_1589725407955759_421000125_n

11356494_1586578251593256_1754990075_n

11248098_708588699266854_1910954809_n

web_image_template_cover1_2048x2048

web_image_template_gold_2048x2048

web_image_template_recycle_2048x2048

Continue Reading

VIDEO – 100 Years of Beauty: Japan

A video reflecting Japanese beauty trends and culture. This video shows progression within the Japanese beauty industry reinforcing the research collated prior to, and whilst on my research trip in Tokyo. Highlighted trends that I am particularly interested in are that of skin lightening culture and why the Japanese see this as their ‘ideal’ and that of Decura fashions, being reflected through historical, socio-cultural events, norms and conventions whilst noting the commercialisation of Western culture and evolving consumerism in recent years. Furthermore, this video also noted the Japanese proverb of, “the nail that sticks out, must be hammered back in”, which was brought to light by, and discussed with Nicole (beauty blogger) in Tokyo. This proverb emphasises the idea of standardisation and conforming to a pre-defined and prescribed ideal of Japanese women, whereby it is seen as ‘inappropriate’ to fall outside this box and not conform. From my research to date, it is evident that rules, conventions, socio-cultural expectations and pre-determined ideals shape the expectation of how women in Japan should look and try to prevent them from having their own identity – hence having a backlash of Decura fashion amongst the ‘Harajuku’ girls, as talked about in my first Professional Context presentation from Semester 1. This ‘look’ is seen at the end of the video!
Source – Last Accessed on 26th Jan 2017

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: Beauty Store/Product Photos

Below shows a large range of different photos taken whilst in beauty stores, exploring a range of trends, models and packaging for example, in order to gain a true sense of what is on offer in Japan in regards to culture and trends, allowing for a comparison with British products and brands alike.

This is also working toward the following objective:

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

Notes have been made below in regard to my findings.

A Japanese model can be seen below advertising a Japanese cosmetics brand, however has lighter skin than the average Japanese woman, and also has blue eyes using contact lenses to both enlarge, and maintain a Western look which can be portrayed to the consumer – with these products and this ‘look’ you could also look more Western.

Again a model with extremely light skin has been used to advertise ‘looks’ created by particular products – this is enforced with a step-by-step guide as seen in many Japanese magazines (discussed on another blog post in more depth).

Western models used to advertise products to remove underarm hair.

20170118_165319-min

Above shows a ‘The Collagen” drink, produced, sold and branded by Shiseido. These drinks claim to stimulate the production of more collagen in the skin, allowing for a more youthful look overtime, feeding the Japanese obsession with looking and feeling young. There are other forms of Anti-Ageing products available in this manner also from different brands, as well as collagen tablets from Shiseido. In addition, it is also possible to buy tablets which slowly lighten the skin with regular use.

20170118_165444-min

20170118_165634-min

20170118_165644-min
Above shows a range of lipcare products which feature Western babies in place of female models. I found this fascinating and shocking, as child pornography was only banned in Japan 2 years ago, and feel in the UK this would be absolutely not acceptable. The copywriting also used – “deep moist” and “juicy” also rings sexual connotations which I find disturbing. Nicole, the beauty blogger, whom took me on this shopping trip in Harajuku, explained the reasoning is because they want youthful, ‘baby soft’ skin and lips – the same marketing strategy is also used with face masks (images shown further down this blog post).

20170118_165735-min
Majolica Menorca is a Japanese cosmetics brand that can be found in drugstores around the city. I noticed with a range of National brands, that unlike here in the UK, the product design and packaging is often ‘cute’, ‘cheap’ and somewhat ‘tacky’ appealing to a young audience.

20170118_165809-min

20170118_165819-min

The above shows a range of light skinned models promoting a Japanese cosmetics range.

20170118_170951-min

Above shows an advert for a ‘sticky pix’ photo booth, whereby images are taken and digitally edited before printing. This particular photo booth makes the participant appear more doll like, i.e. Barbie as seen here.

20170118_171528-min

20170118_171606-min

The above false eye lash companies have used a range of fair haired and light skinned Japanese models, which resemble a Western look which is often desired amongst young women in Japan; these are not natural hair colours for Japanese people and therefore aim to achieve a more Western look.

20170118_171638-min

Above shows again the cute, kawaii, aesthetic often used in Japan for cosmetic packaging, here using a cat on the POS reflecting a kitten theme cosmetic range appealing to a young female audience.

20170118_171817-min

20170118_172204-min

POS displays showcasing step by step and how to achieve the look guides as often seen in Japanese magazines. Japanese women feel the need to know outcome will be seen with the product at hand before purchase.

20170118_172207-min

20170118_172211-min

20170118_172214-min

L’oreal in Japan, a European cosmetics brand, even in Japan uses mainly Western models to promote the brand. I did find however that a different product range is available utilising more lip glosses and stains than lipsticks, and a larger range of face powders, BB creams and CC creams, opposed to heavy foundations as seen in the UK.

20170120_165440-min

20170120_165441-min

Contact lenses in a range of colours and styles can be purchased off the counter in order to achieve bigger eyes like that seen in Western people. This is denoted in the pictures used on the POS.

20170120_183657-min

Again babies are often used to promote youthful, baby skin and baby soft lips. I feel that this extreme is still seen as okay in Japan due to child pornography only being made illegal and punishable in 2014. In addition, the babies used on the product packaging are always Western babies, not Japanese.

20170121_205659-min

Western looking Japanese models are often used denoting the classic stereotypical Western look – blonde hair and big eyes. Makeup and contact lenses are used to achieve this look, along with hair dye. The model used here is a famous Japanese model whom is half English.

20170121_205701-min

20170121_205705-min

20170121_205711-min

As above, very Western looking Japanese models are often used denoting the classic stereotypical Western look – blonde hair and big eyes. Makeup and contact lenses are used to achieve this look, along with hair dye. The model used here is a famous Japanese model whom is half English.

20170121_205824-min

20170121_205832-min

A range of ‘mouth pieces’ can be bought in Japanese drug stores, designed to give a more Western look. These are designed to overtime change the shape of the lips. Mainly Western models are used again, along with how-to guides.

received_10208443003534286-min

20170118_175835-min

20170118_181336-min

20170118_183426-min

20170118_183431-min

Above; a wide range of skin-lightening skincare products and cosmetics, including s placenta based range. This is popular in Japan due to scientifically being proven to give anti-aging skin.

20170118_183502-min

20170118_183530-min

20170118_183540-min

20170118_183603-min

20170118_183636-min

20170118_183651-min

20170118_193318-min

20170118_193334-min

Above shows a range of beauty and fashion advertisements/promotions, all of which feature Western models and icons. The brands that are shown are all known to be European brands, and use the same models as in European/Western countries in order to maintain International brand image and reputation.

20170118_193611-min

20170118_193812-min

Above and below; a range of skin-lightening and whitening cosmetics from MAC Cosmetics, which are not available to buy in the UK. International brands have started to cater for Japanese audiences and trends, this is the same as Chanel Cosmetics, Dior Cosmetics and YSL Beauty, for example.

20170118_193842-min

20170118_194315-min

20170118_194406-min

20170118_194437-min

Above; Shu Umera; a Japanese cosmetics brand promoted via the use of Western models featuring different ‘looks’. A range of 4D skin lightening products are also available to buy, which are not available at concessions in the UK.

20170118_200223-min

Western icon Natalie Portman is shown above modelling for Dior to maintain an International standard of advertising and marketing for the brand, whilst keeping in line with the International brand image.

20170118_174141-min

Above; another Western baby is used for the promotion of a moisturising lipstick, however this time the baby features blonde hair and big blue eyes – desired looks in a Westerner, or Gaijin to the Japanese.

 

 

20170118_174830-min

20170118_174832-min

Above shows a range of placenta based skin-lightening products used for ‘anti-aging’.

 

 

20170118_175005-min

Above; a baby again is used to promote placenta based products, however this time a Japanese baby is used in contrast to the other products noted.

20170118_175009-min

20170118_175016-min

Above shows a wide range of skin lightening products available in a Japanese drug store. On the POS a very fair skinned Japanese model is used with white hair, in order to promote a series of skin bleaching products.

 

No self-tanning products were available at all to buy in Japan. When asked in stores if such products were available, 99% of consultants did not know what this was, or was for. And when explained, found this fascinating in relation to their culture and fascination of skin-lightening and anti-tanning.

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: Local Promotional Collateral

Below shows a range of scans and photographs of locally produced and printed beauty magazines which I picked up across Tokyo on my research trip to Japan.

I have chosen to document the following due to aesthetic design choices, to aid my practical work, whilst also documenting a range of skin-lightening products, adverts and step-by-step tutorials as noted across many different local and national Japanese magazines. In addition, I also found interesting that regardless of product or brand, young models with fairly light skin have been used, promoting the Japanese ‘ideal’. Emphasis in Japan is primarily on youthfulness opposed to being ‘skinny’ and losing weight/gym going as often seen in the UK at the moment across magazines and social media.

This is also working toward the following objective:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

20170122_101706-min

local-magazine

local-magazine-1

local-magazine-2

local-magazine-3

local-magazine-4

local-magazine-5

local-magazine-6

local-magazine-7

local-magazine-8

local-magazine-9

local-magazine-10

local-magazine-11

local-magazine-12

local-magazine-13

local-magazine-14

local-magazine-15

local-beauty

img_20170122_173811_306-min

In addition, I also found the above two images interesting – one is a range of scanned in leaflets for a range of brands and products – all featuring light-skinned, very youthful models as well as noting that luxury brands, such as Chanel are using Western models in Japan to promote their products. The second image, is a photograph taken in Ginza station, whereby a cosmetic surgery clinic advertisement is shown, featuring all Japanese text and a Western model with blonde hair, and blue eyes – not a Japanese lady. This enforces the idea that having surgery could make you look Western as the model seen by having the work done highlighted with illustrations.

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: National Magazines

Below shows a range of scanned in spreads and magazine covers from a range of National Japanese Fashion and Beauty magazines which I purchased during my research trip to Tokyo. I picked these up due to having a different angle in regard to both content and design, to that of Vogue magazine and Harpers Bazaar. In addition, I also found these to be great visual references and inspirations in regard to aesthetics and design choices, with a range of colour, typography and layout being used, giving each a distinct ‘Japanese’ tone, opposed to being more ‘Westernised’ as seen across Vogue, for example.

Unlike the Vogue and Harpers Bazaar, these magazines have around 90% Japanese led content. This includes, models, advertisements, brands noted and editorial content. However, similarly to Vogue, magazines such as ViVi and Nylon still use English for their main headlines, allowing ‘Gajins’ or ‘foreigners’ to still relate, and understand the article at hand even without reading the full body of text.

Also shown is a magazine, Maquia, which is entirely based on beauty – no magazines of this nature are available in the UK, and shows how big the beauty industry is in Japan in relation to at home. Within the magazine is a combination of both Japanese and Western brands, however featured are ONLY Japanese models, opposed to a combination, or a predominant Western influence. Step-by-step guides are heavily seen through Maquia, and other magazines such as Ginza, which allow consumers to understand how to use products and what the outcome will be – this was discussed on a previous blog post, as well as being discussed heavily with both Nicole Takahashi (beauty blogger) and Vogue Japan in different interviews during my time in Tokyo.

I have noted on a previous post, that Japanese women want to look youthful, and this is reflected through the aesthetic design choices, including elements of collage and typography, as well as having a playful and energetic approach to the layout design. I find these magazines extremely inspiring and hope to channel this aesthetic into my practical work throughout this semester and going forward also. British magazines tend to be affluent in design, being more stripped back, whilst these particular examples show an influx of products, and design direction, which really differentiate the two cultures which I am researching into comparative nature.

This is also working toward the following objective:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

img_20170120_173019_136-min

vivi

vivi-1

vivi-2

vivi-3

vivi-4

vivi-5

nylon

nylon-1

nylon-2

nylon-3

nylon-4

mary-jenny-1

mary-jenny-2

mary-jenny

maquia

maquia-1

maquia-2

maquia-3

maquia-4

ginza

ginza-1

ginza-2

ginza-3

ginza-4

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: International Magazines

Whilst in Tokyo, I picked up the latest Japanese editions of both Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue, which in relation to National Japanese magazines is a huge contrast in regard to content, design, models and editorial decisions. Unlike the National magazines which feature around 90% Japanese models, these magazines noted below, feature around 90% Western models. From my research to date, and from speaking with Vogue in Japan, this is due to the nature of the publications being of an International nature, and thereby need to maintain this in order to keep in line with, and maintain the ‘Vogue’ or ‘Harpers’ Bazaar’ title and standard. This is also why headlines are noted in English writing, allowing for International readers, such as myself, being able to understand what each article/spread is about, even if one can not read the full body of text. Product/brand names are also noted in English AND Japanese throughout, again in order to relate to a mass, international audience, allowing for consumers to purchase, or look up products/garments of interest for example.

Both of these magazines, also now have digital editions which can be downloaded via the Apple Store, or their relevant websites. This is advertised and noted on the cover of each magazine, as shown below.

In comparison to the Local and National Japanese Fashion and Beauty magazines, the aesthetic design decisions are stripped back in comparison, whilst still being much more daring, and playful in design than the UK editions. Whilst talking with Vogue, this was raised and questioned, and is due to Japanese women wanting to be youthful and playful, whilst falling in line with the ‘cute’ or ‘Kawaii’ themes which are popular in Japan across editorial design, beauty products and garments, allowing for a visual relationship to be built with the reader. It was important to understand this in relation to self-perception issues in order to understand how magazines can affect perceptions within Japanese women, and likewise the perceptions of others in regard to external and visual influences.

A range of Western models, all of which have fairly light skin, have been used throughout the magazine alongside Japanese models whom look fairly Western also in regards to skin-tone and eye shape, portraying the known ‘ideal’ in Japan, whilst enforcing a major Western influence.

It can also be seen that celebrities and icons featured are Western, opposed to being National Japanese icons, and again this falls in line with the idea of maintaining the ‘International’ title of both magazines and what they stand for – affluent, inspirational, well-know and established high-end Fashion/Beauty trends. When I asked Vogue about this, and its reasoning, it was established that Japanese icons wouldn’t be as well received or recognised by an International audience, and by using Western icons and models, differentiates them from the National and International magazines which are seen across many magazines on the shelves in Japan.

This is also working toward the following objective:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

harpers-bazaar

harpers-bazaar-1

harpers-bazaar-2

harpers-bazaar-3

vogue

vogue-1

vogue-2

vogue-3

vogue-4

vogue-5

vogue-6

vogue-7

vogue-8

 

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: ADMT (Advertising Design Museum Tokyo)

Whilst in Tokyo, I visited the ADMT, in order to gain information and visual inspiration in regards to how the use of women within advertising has changed overtime, as women in Japan are only seen more recently as ‘equal’ to men in regard to their social and work status.

I found this a really beneficial trip due to featuring a show reel of Shiseido TV advertisements over the years, which unfortunately, I was unable to record. The advertisements spanned from the 1950s to present day, and featured a mix of both Western and Japanese models/stars.

I was however able to collate some printed materials and photographs, which I have documented below.

This is also working toward the following objectives:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

admt-1

admt-2

admt-3

admt-4

Above shows an advertisement for a Japanese face cream – what I found interesting is that even though this is not a Shiseido campaign, the same marketing strategy of using a mirror within the artwork – the self-surveying gaze – whilst also having a pleasing smile on her face looking at her reflection. This has been discussed in more depth below, in relation to another Shiseido advertisement.

admt-5

admt-6I have included the exhibition guide above from ‘The One Show’, which notes a feature on the L’Oréal Make Up Genuis app. Again, each of the above had a relevant film to watch, along with an iPad allowing for a user to experiment with the app in the gallery. I was however unable to record this video. The main purpose of the app is to take away the stigmas and embarrassment of trying on products in store, whilst also being one of the first mobile apps where you can try on products via augmented reality, and then purchase them also through the app. This is similar to the Shiseido Mirror, however this is only available to use at the Ginza store. The L’Oréal app also allows for reduced foot flow in stores, easing the pressure of staff in a manic environment, whereby in Japan, L’Oréal is seen as quite a luxurious brand and is sold in the equivalent of Harvey Nichols example, opposed to here in England where it is predominantly featured in ‘drugstores’ on the highstreet.

admt-7

admt-8

admt-9

admt-10

These particular scans have been taken from a book produced and written by POLA, the Japanese Research Institute of Beauty and Culture. I felt very lucky to of come across this at the ADMT, as it shows the progression of the beauty industry, products and advertising over the past decade. I found from analysing this that there has always been a culture of ‘skin-lightening’ and youthfulness amongst women, due to as previously noted, socio-cultural and historical backgrounds, however also noted that I was Shiseido in the 1940s whom brought in and introduced Western models to work with throughout their campaigns for Beauty Cake – a very pale foundation with a very high SPF. I found remarkable however, that the advertisement is shot on a beach, proving the point that with this foundation you can enjoy the sun and the weather, but you WILL NOT TAN. Furthermore, the hat and costume worn are white – adding to the notion that ‘white is beautiful’. I was very happy to of come across this booklet and campaign, as this has reaffirmed previous research into Japanese culture and the obsession with ‘white skin’, as also in the journal, ‘Cultivating Japanese Whiteness’ by Ashikari, M (2005). This has been analysed and discussed in depth on a previous blog post.

admt-12

admt-13

admt-14

admt-15

admt-16

admt-17

admt-18

admt

admt-book

admt-book-1

The book shown above was purchased at the ADMT store, and features a range of advertisements over the years, showing the progression of design whilst also showing how women have been used over the years in ad campaigns for both shopping centres and the Shiseido brand – as seen above. This I found complemented the various postcards and imagery taken from the Shiseido Ginza store, whilst also reaffirming research from a Shiseido journal (previous blog post), whereby mirrors or reflective surfaces were often use in campaigns, hinting at the self-surveying gaze theory as heavily discussed previous on various blog posts, and in my Professional Context presentations from Semester 1. This theory was derived by Shields and Heinecken (2002).
20170122_101644-min

20170122_101649-min

20170122_101654-min

20170122_101658-min

20170119_122557-min

20170119_122617-min

Above shows a book which I picked up in the ADMT library (which was absolutely incredible), and featured a range of Japanese Graphics, in particular Cosmetics packaging. I found this inspiring, and again, to see so much design work around the Beauty industry predominantly, allowed for an insight once again into how important and vast the industry is to the Japanese people.

Above also shows a range of ‘AD STUDIES’ magazines – each was tailored around a specific topic and stemmed back from early 2000s to present day issue. I was able to take a few away, and have included photographs above. I have found these useful in regard to design and layout inspiration whilst also having specific features and campaigns of interest within, i.e. Geisha specific artwork, whereby the current ‘ideal’ can be recognised stemming back to socio-cultural and historial routes, irregardless of a Western influence.

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: Shiseido

Below shows a range of primary research which has been collated from my research trip to Tokyo, Japan.

The Shiseido Magazine was brought to my attention whilst talking with Toni Hollowood, and was unable to source one at Shiseido stockists in the UK. Whilst at the Shiseido Ginza store, I was able to pick one up.

I was taken back with their magazine, for a cosmetics company, the magazine is beautifully designed with great editorial content and photography. I was particularly interested in the content choices and have made several notes below.

This is also working toward the following objectives:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

shiseido-magazine

shiseido-magazine-1

Above: In certain articles, Japanese models are used, and I did notice that they have very light skin, representing the vast range of skin-lightening products which the brand has to offer.

shiseido-magazine-2

shiseido-magazine-3

Above: I noticed on the editorial above however, that even though shot in Tokyo, and features Japanese men, the female model is Western. I found this an interesting contrast in relation to the other spreads, especially due to having a Tokyo based theme for this specific editorial. However, I find the chosen model interesting due to hair and skin colour, not being common with Japanese females.

shiseido-magazine-4

shiseido-magazine-5

shiseido-magazine-6

Above: I found the above spreads interesting in regards to design, and aesthetic choices, being typically ‘Japanese’. These are very inspiring for my practical project.

Furthermore, including a cat in the photoshoot I also found fascinating due to this often being seen promoting Japanese products such as Canmake and Paul and Joe, as seen in a following blog post. This ties in with the Kawaii, or ‘cute’ theme which is often seen in Japan adding a further youthful tone of voice and context. I found from previous research, reading academic journals and visual research, whilst being reaffirmed in interviews in Japan with Nicole (beauty blogger), and Vogue, that Japanese women’s primary focus with their beauty regimes is about looking ‘young’ with ‘baby-esk’ skin.

shiseido-1

Above: The left hand side page shows an exhibition advert. The exhibition was held at the Shiseido Gallery which I visited in Ginza. The concept relayed around rays of ‘light’. The right hand side page looks at various new products, comparing prices and ‘end results’, including a range of skin-lightening seems.

shiseido-2

shiseido-3

shiseido-4

Above: Above shows a double sided leaflet taken from the Shiseido store, looking at a new cushion-based foundation. I found this interesting due to using again, very young models, whilst on the reverse shows a step-by-step guide of recreating each of the models looks. From my research to date, as seen in many of the National Japanese magazines, women purchasing products want to know exactly how to apply such products and what the benefits are. This can also be seen on the right, whereby each product shows swatches of other shades available, clearly noting to the end-user what is on offer, what it does and how much this will set them back in regards to Japanese Yen.

shiseido-5

Above: Two postcards which I bought in the Shiseido store. I purchased these due to heavily reflecting the self-surveying gaze theory as discussed in previous posts, both in relation to theoretical perspectives, but also in regard to Shiseido advertising campaigns which in the 1950s utilised this marketing strategy. This is something which has been discussed and analysed in depth on a previous blog post, whilst also appearing in my dissertation along with the image above to add context.

20170119_140344-min

20170119_140351-min

20170119_140425-min

20170119_140428-min
20170119_140456-min

20170119_140519-min

20170119_140535-min

20170119_140613-min

20170119_140625-min

20170119_140634-min

20170119_140639-min

20170119_140646-min

20170119_140844-min

20170119_140915-min

Above: Above shows a vast range of products on offer which can help lighten ones skin and prevent ageing. The amount of products on offer in comparison to the 4 products found in a stockist in the UK was overwhelming, but shows how important this ‘trend’ or ‘culture’ is to Japanese women.

In addition, the Shiseido Makeup Mirror was also found and played with, which after analysing and discussing heavily last semester in regard to new technologies within my field of practice was amazing to see and use. The mirror was also discussed in my first Professional Context presentation – this was the first augmented reality mirror to be designed and created by a cosmetics brand, and has since, similar versions have been designed and are being used by brands such as L’Oreal in both Japan and China. The mirror is an interesting idea, as it shows you how you look with different products, whilst the computer attached shares in-depth product information so the end-user is aware of what they are buying. I personally, did not see any Japanese women try any products on in store – everything was done via the Shiseido Mirror, reaffirming the stigmatism and ’embarrassment’ of trying on a range of products in store. This was also discussed last semester in relation to these new technologies.

Continue Reading

Japan Research Trip – Mind-map of Collated Research

I have compiled a mind-map in order to collate my findings from my research trip to Tokyo, Japan. From this I plan on creating further mind maps and blog posts relating to each point noted below.

This is also working toward the following objective:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

3. To work with and interview those both actively working in the Fashion and Beauty Industries, and those on a consumer/follower/user basis, to compare behaviours and perspectives in relation to body image and self-perceptions.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

 

japan-mindmap

Continue Reading

Japanese Beauty Tutorial – National Magazines

Whilst looking online for recent Shiseido campaigns, I came across these makeup tutorials which have been taken from national magazines. I found them interesting in regards to the kitsch, cute and typically graphic aesthetic, whilst also be relative contextually to my current research, and furthermore the Lisa Eldridge tutorial discussed, whereby it was noted that many Japanese, use cosmetics to open out the eyes, make them look bigger. This is something which was also noted in Semester 1, whilst analysing YouTube mini-documentary interviews with young females in Tokyo regarding beauty standards and ideals in Japan, whilst also addressing what ‘traits’ they find attractive in foreigners (blog post can be found here for reference). In addition, both of the spreads featured have an emphasis on step-by-step guides on how to recreate a certain look which is something I want to question whilst carrying out primary research in Japan, in order to understand why this is, as this is far removed from the tutorials and beauty campaigns seen in British magazines, for example.

I will be looking out for national magazines in Japan to look for further beauty/exercise regimes which can be compared to Vogue ‘Nippon’ magazines, whilst also having the opportunity to discuss such tutorials and techniques with Nicole Takahashi, a Japanese beauty blogger.

I also hope to gain further contextual understanding, and hope to seek more visual influences and aesthetic inspirations, which I hope to feed into my practical work during this semester, allowing for research to inform my practice, as seen in semester 1.

687ff29473920bd6d0219e781067e98b

Image Source

tumblr_m9cr34pt911r9pu6wo1_500

Image Source

Continue Reading