Shiseido, Pop-Culture and Advertising

I came across the below advertising examples from Shiseido whilst looking at their more recent campaign materials for 2017. I found it interesting that the brand have taken a step away from ‘traditional’ advertising in regards to glossy finishes and large copywriting, pulling the customer in, and have instead turned to celebrities, icons and bloggers, like many Western brands such as Maybelline (please see previous posts). As much as this reinforces how social media, celebrity culture and blogger culture are having an impact on marketing strategies, this also allows for a further, and instant connection between digital technologies, brand power and consumerist trends.

Even though these are print-led ‘advertising campaigns’ digitally led visuals and pop-culture ‘icons’ have been chosen as ambassadors, reinforcing the point of consumers generating a personal association with a brand, whilst buying into a message of that, ‘with our brand and our products, you too could be like them’. This is shown through the use of using Lady Gaga, The ‘Top’ Eastern Asian Icons and Japanese Beauty Bloggers. What I found even more interesting was that the imagery chosen of Lady Gaga, were all her own selfies that had been taken from her Instagram account, again causing a connection with the brand, and fans of Gaga alike, whilst forming a sense of inclusion. Using selfies from social media, reminded me of the ‘mirror gaze’ theory which was often featured in Shiseido’s earlier advertising, “reflecting their images to an external audience” whilst “self-inspecting” (Weisenfield, G. 2009), showing ones self-awareness. Furthermore in relation to Gaga, a Western ‘icon’ has been chosen whom has very light skin, fitting in with the stereotypical and promoted Japanese ‘ideal.

This ideology is also reflected in the further examples shown below.

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Below shows two different campaigns, one which showcases  The ‘Top’ Eastern Asian Icons and the other which showcases the lineup of Japanese Beauty Bloggers which will be used as ambassadors for the Shiseido brand. In contrast to the above, this really surprised me. Yes, the majority are portrayed to have very light skin, however all are of Asian race, opposed to Western as seen above with Lady Gaga. This makes me question the use of Lady Gaga as Japan and Eastern Asia obviously do have their own National icons, however, globalisation of Western culture, celebrity and consumerist trends I feel are still taken into account, claiming a share of an International market place.

Whilst in Japan I am keen to see what visuals and models are used in their stores, as well as featured in the National advertising campaigns.

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Sources:
Weisenfield, G (2009). Visualising Culture; Selling Shiseido. Massachusetts: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. P, 24.

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A Conversation with Toni Hollowood

Below shows notes made from the audio recording of my meeting with CSM MA student Toni Hollowood, who has looked into issues surrounding DIY Beauty in relation to social media surrounding the beauty industry for her research and practical project.

A recording of this will be submitted on a USB along with all other recorded interviews, whilst being noted in my appendices of my dissertation, with print outs of the notes featured below for reference.

This is working toward the following objectives:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

3. To work with and interview those both actively working in the Fashion and Beauty Industries, and those on a consumer/follower/user basis, to compare behaviours and perspectives in relation to body image and self-perceptions.

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Vogue Japan Photography: East Meets West

A range of editorial photographs and advertisements which have been taken from various Japanese Vogue magazines whereby Western and Eastern beauty ideals and cultures meet. This is also known as ‘cultural confluence’.

The examples below show a range of both Japanese and Western models photographed together whilst also showing cultural appropriation, utilising Western models, with traditional Japanese makeup inspired by the Geisha. Furthermore, Catholicism is hinted at in the second example shown, which I find fascinating due to Japanese not believing in this faith. In addition, a Vogue cover is shown, whereby a range of ‘perfect icons’ are featured on a wrap cover – one of which are Japanese. Even so, each model chosen has a ‘western look’. An advertisement showing Penelope Cruz has also been noted, due to having what appears to be photoshopped skin, in order to make the Latino star’s skin lighter to tie in with Japanese ideals and trends.

I want to continue to look out for further examples if this cultural confluence and appropriation whilst on my research trip in Tokyo, in order to see how modern day beauty ideals are reflected through magazines and advertisements.

I also want to understand through my upcoming research and interviews in Tokyo, Japan why this is often done, and if/how this can affect the perceptions of Japanese women by being exposed to Western influences and standards of beauty.

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Shiseido Advertising Campaigns of Contextual Relevance and Aesthetic Interest

Below shows relevant sections of Weisenfield’s Visualising Culture; Selling Shiseido (2009), visual essay, which I felt summarises the history of brand, whilst also looking at underlying cultural and social contexts which really helped bring to light why current trends and ‘ideals’ exist, or feature in Japan so heavily.

I found this extremely interesting to read, and found overlaps from recent conversation with Vicky at Space NK and other academic research regarding the modern positioning of cosmetics and beauty in Japan. I also uncovered further context surrounding theories such as ‘The Gaze” (Mulvey, L. 1999) and “The Self-Surveying Gaze” (Shields and Heineken. 2002), for example, which were analysed heavily in Semester 1 in relation to my research topic.

Overall the below reflects a range of key-topics such as; skin-lightening products, their use of theory-led advertising campaigns and western models, whilst also accounting for social and cultural history of ‘working class women’.

 

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(Above, P.3)

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(Above, P.11)

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(Above, P.13)

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(Above, P.12)

screen-shot-2017-01-11-at-22-52-10(Above, P.23)

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(Above, P.24)

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(Above, P.25)

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(Above, P.27)

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(Above, P.39)

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(Above, P.44)

screen-shot-2017-01-11-at-22-31-52(Above, P.49)

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(Above, P.50)

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(Above, P.53)

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(Above, P.51)

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(Above, P.54)

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(Above, P.55)

Sources:
Weisenfield, G (2009). Visualising Culture; Selling Shiseido. Massachusetts: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. P, Various.

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Shiseido: Harvey Nichols & SPACE NK – Leeds

Today I visited Space NK and Harvey Nichols in Leeds, to find out prior to visiting Japan, which Shiseido products are currently on offer in the UK. No other stockists sell Shiseido in Leeds, therefore was keen to see this as a comparison to the brand in it’s native home of Japan. I also hoped to take photos/collect any marketing materials/ad campaign material which may be visible, again to compare with the Japanese collateral – i.e. model, copywriting, product name, etc.

Harvey Nichols:
In Harvey Nichols, I found a very small range of 6 skincare products, at the back of the store – I was unable to photograph the selection being surrounded by beauty consultants and felt this was inappropriate to do so. I found that Shiseido used to have a cosmetics and skincare concession in Harvey Nichols, selling a full range of products, but has since been removed and now features a small range within a wall of more ‘remote’, or ‘new’ and not as well known, products and brands such as Iconic. All of the staff members in the department were too new to Harvey Nichols to tell me why the concession was removed – my only thought was that it could not compete with the likes of MAC and Benefit which fill the first floor of the store, perhaps not being as understood by a British audience, or not being so well received due to the lack of advertising and marketing surrounding the UK demographic. I did ask for any Shiseido marketing materials or magazines, to which I was informed they do not stock, nor know of, at all in their working experience at Harvey Nichols for such brand. I was advised to visit Space NK, another stockist, across the road to enquire with them regarding this. From my research, a full range of Shiseido products in still available online, on the Harvey Nichols website. I did find interesting however, that, out of the few products in the store, 3 of which featured skin-lightening or ‘whitening’ in the product name. I was told by a member of staff that this was most likely a brand-conscious/buyer decision, in regard to still catering for the Asian market and demographic within Leeds, as these ‘types’ of products are not readily available in the Western/British market.

Space NK:
After being directed to Space NK by a beauty consultant at Harvey Nichols, I was informed that only 1 product was actually stocked in-store – beauty blotting paper. I found this surprising for a cosmetics store, however was also told that last summer they did stock the Shiseido Summer Range, consisting of SPF products, aimed at preserving ‘white skin’. Again like Harvey Nichols, found that this would of been a conscious decision, possibly catering for the Asian market in Leeds. I found it interesting that cosmetic products weren’t stocked, however Shiseido ultimately have been known for their technical innovations and formulations, making them stand-out with their skincare products primarily. There was also no marketing materials in store for Shiseido, and was directed to their website to view the advertising campaigns if desired.

Whilst in-store, I was speaking with a Korean Beauty Consultant, Vicky, whom I found extremely interesting and helpful in regards to discussing areas of interest surrounding my research trip to Japan. Vicky took a great interest in my research project, and took some time to talk to me about Japanese culture, history and its association with modern day beauty, as well as discussing products, brands, bloggers, social media and trends.

The main points in raised in conversation were:

  • Korean Beauty trends influencing China and Japan’s beauty regimes – both skincare and cosmetics. Lisa Eldridge has been known to take her influences from Korea in regards to innovation, formula and trend, whilst working with in Japan with brands such as Shiseido and Lancome.
  • Contrasts between stereotypes of British people wanting to tan, and Japanese people wanting to ‘lighten’ or ‘whiten’ their skin. It was said by Vicky that this ‘ideal’ of Japaneseness, comes down to the history of the culture and society in regards to work, wealth and status. In the ‘olden’ times, it was known that if you had a tan, it was likely that you worked outside either farming, or building, for example, whilst if you had ‘white’ skin, you would be indoors, leading one to the assumption of one’s education, superior job role and high class status. It was not seen as a good thing to have a tan, and this ‘ideal’ has carried on through to present day, further pushed with the globalisation of celebrity, culture, international brands, publishing/advertising, communication and social media. Hierarchy and sense of ‘place’ are known in Japan to be respected, and it was said that no one wants to be seen at the bottom of the hierarchy, whether it be in society or at work. This allows for markets such as ‘skin-lightening’ products and fashion magazines to become readily available, with one then being able to buy into a sense of better being, belonging and status, being accepted as one of ‘them’, opposed to being perceived as ‘one of us’ in contrast. This idea is also discussed in Mikiko Ashikari’s Journal, ‘Cultivating Japanese Whiteness’ (2005).

This is also working toward the following objectives:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

3. To work with and interview those both actively working in the Fashion and Beauty Industries, and those on a consumer/follower/user basis, to compare behaviours and perspectives in relation to body image and self-perceptions.

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‘Cultivating Japanese Whiteness’ Ashikari, M (2005)

Below shows part of a journal written by Ashikari (2005), regarding the well-know Japanese beauty trend of ‘skin-lightening’. This journal in particular looks at this in a cultural, historical and social context. It also highlights how both Japanese and Western brands uses suggestive and clever copywriting and marketing within their ad campaigns. This is something which I will be looking out for during my research trip to Tokyo.

Main points raised throughout the journal:

  • Two perspectives on the ‘skin lightening’ trend, and where this has stemmed from – western influences and commercialisation, as well as traditional values and historical cultures in Japan (if you were a woman whom worked an outdoor labouring job, this seen as a ‘poor’ trade and meant you tanned naturally, whilst those in aristocracy or working inside, allowed for a more affluent lifestyle, and lighter skin).
  • Copywriting and marketing of consumer goods and magazines can be tactful and clever.
  • Opposite to the UK – tanning is popular in the UK and is seen as a sign of affluence and holiday-going.
  • Ties with traditional Japanese culture, symbols and identity – the Geisha.
  • ‘White’ skin is considered beautiful and more preferable.
  • Emphasis on ‘youthful and natural’ skin via anti-ageing and skin-lightening products, opposed to heavy makeup trends, as often seen in Western culture.
  • Allows for a feeling of inclusion and belonging.
  • Cannot escape the ‘ideal’ due to an influx of the above points.

The above points I would like to talk to about further whilst seeing Vogue Japan, and a Japanese Beauty Blogger I have made contact with in Tokyo, whilst on my trip in order to gain their insights and perspectives on this, whilst affirming the points made throughout this journal.

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Source:
Ashikari, M. (2005). Cultivating Japanese Whiteness. Journal of Material Culture. 10 (1), P. 73-90.

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Shiseido: About, History and Context

Shiseido has arisen in research several times throughout my research to date:

Semester 1

  • Looking at Skin Lightening Creams.

Semester 2

  • Comp shopping for cross-cultural comparisons on product range and promotional materials.
  • Advertising materials discussed during conversation with Toni Hollowood.
  • Discussed in regards to informative tutorials on product and brand by Lisa Eldridge (see previous post).
  • In the journal, “Cultivating Japanese Whiteness” (2005) by Mikiko Ashikari in regards to influential copywriting within advertising, and brand-based collateral.

I therefore decided to research more into the Japanese brand before travelling to Tokyo, to carry out primary research. I wanted to look into their history, as through my reading and research to date, it has become apparent of late that Shiseido have been, and are still, extremely large influencers in Japanese ideals of beauty.

‘Shiseido Group’ now controls multiple brands in multiple countries across the world, opposed to being a Japanese company (i.e. NARS USA and Issy Mayake Fragrances). This is reflected through the imagery on the homepage of the group website below, however the copywriting, in my opinion reflects a somewhat indirect connection with a specific Japanese audience. I feel this is also highlighted, indirectly yet consciously, by the Japanese woman situated in the centre of the gridded images.

The copy reads;

“Beauty lies within… and every time we bring it to light, we make the world a little brighter”.

From my research, I found the use of the world “light” to signify ‘white’ – none of the 9 shown are of Black Caribbean or African decent, for example. The 9 people shown are of either caucasian or asian decent, hinting at racial prejudices and racial identity still being key factors for a Japanese brand. This is an idea discussed heavily in the writings of Mikiko Ashikari’s “Cultivating Japanese Whiteness” (2005), whereby it is stated that:

“Hiroshi Wagatsuma, a Japanese anthropologist who studied in the US, was probably the first to conduct anthropological research on skin colour in Japan. In his English article of 1967, he argued that a dichotomy observed in the 1960s in Japan, ‘white/beautiful versus black/ugly’, should be attributed to Japanese aesthetic values (Wagatsuma, 1967: 407)”

Ashikari (2005) also notes in regards to racial identity that:

“A lot of recent studies suggest that Japanese identity is largely based on a sense of racial identity (see Kondo, 1997; Oguma, 1995; Siddle, 1997; Weiner, 1997; Yoshino, 1992, 1997). Most studies conclude thus, by examining either historical documents or racial images distributed by the mass media in contemporary Japan.”

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In relation to the copywriting below of the ‘brand message’, I found it staggering that the word, ‘beautifully’ is noted 5 times in the screenshot below, plus the use of the word, ‘beautiful’ once. The emphasis on living a beautiful life, essentially gives consumers the ideology and belief that through buying into their brand and products, they can also live “This life. Beautifully.” too.

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Below covers Shiseido’s history as a brand which allows for understanding of present day the beauty cultures in Japan. Excerpts have been taken from the ‘History’ page on the Shiseido Group website, along with visual and written contextual support from Weisenfield’s Visualising Culture; Selling Shiseido (2009) visual essay. I found this extremely interesting to read, and found overlaps from recent conversation and other academic research regarding modern positioning of cosmetics and beauty in Japan, whilst being able to relate to theories such as ‘The Gaze” (Mulvey, L. 1999) and “The Self-Surveying Gaze” (Shields and Heineken. 2002), for example, which were analysed in Semester 1.

I have chosen to include key excerpts which I feel encompass the history as a brand and have perhaps furthermore shaped present day perceptions and ideologies of the Japanese, and ‘Japaneseness’, allowing a better understanding in relation to my research topic.

Overall the below reflects a range of key-topics such as; skin-lightening products, their use of theory-led advertising campaigns and western models, whilst also accounting for social and cultural history of ‘working class women’.

History of Shiseido in Conext:

  • Established in 1872 in Ginza, Tokyo
  • Releases “Seven Colours Face Powder” in 1917

This was a white powder which was made up of seven colours in order to match each skin tone – white, yellow, flesh, rose, peony, green and purple. The powder was very popular among Geishas as a means of “projecting an appealing image under the lights”.

  • Released the nine-color “Modern Colour Face Powder ” in 1932.
  • Released the 1st “Shiseido Geppo”, a cultural information magazine for their customers. This ran until 1931.
  • Designed Japanese logo in 1927.
  • Designed Western version of the logo in 1928.
  • ‘The Miss Shiseido’ Promotional Campaigns began in 1934.

In 1934, nine women (chosen from 240) debuted as ‘Miss Shiseido’ (a beauty consultant). Over the course of seven months of preparatory training, the women studied in such areas as beauty techniques, cosmetology, dermatology, physiology, publicity, dress, fashion, singing, Western painting and drawing, and etiquette, and they were expected to display a wide range of knowledge and sophistication. The first engagement for the Miss Shiseido women was the Theater of Modern Beauty, which opened throughout Japan beginning with Takashimaya in Osaka. Presented in a stage format, the five scenes were a unique way of introducing the latest beauty methods and techniques so that the audience could absorb beauty knowledge while enjoying the show.

After the performance, the women quickly changed into their uniforms and provided beauty counseling to each visitor one by one, and wrote down beauty prescriptions for them.

This was the start of the “counter activity” (storefront activity) to introduce beauty methods that suited the skin type and taste of each customer.

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  • First makeup campaign in launched in 1961.

At the time the Japanese economy was stable, the age of mass production and mass consumption had begun, and people’s living standards had improved. Against this background, Shiseido put on its ’61 Candy Tone campaign to bring to the forefront the seven lipstick colors that were expected to be fashionable that spring. A good impression was made on consumers through cooperation between advertising and points of sale. Starting with this campaign, Shiseido would go on to expand each of its seasonal campaigns.

  • Launches “Beloved by the Sun” campaign in 1966, which was shot in Hawaii.

In 1966, Shiseido adopted the “sun” as the theme of its “Beloved by the Sun” summer campaign featuring the healthy beauty of tanned skin. The campaign was a big success, turning people towards the idea that tanned skin was part of a woman’s right to be beautiful.In addition, it was the first time in Japan that an overseas photo shoot had been done in Hawaii, making the posters so popular for a time that they were being stolen from stores throughout Japan, and the formerly unknown model, Bibari Maeda, became a star overnight. This summer campaign was the start of promotions glorifying summer under the shining sun.

  • “The Art of Beauty” Exhibition launched in 1985, celebrating 113 of Advertising from Shiseido.

In 1985, at the request of the New York Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), “The Art of Beauty” exhibition of Shiseido advertising was held as part of the twentieth anniversary commemorative event for Shiseido Cosmetics America. Ad designs and posters, as well as product packaging and more were shown in contemporary settings. High praise was showered on the original artistic qualities of Shiseido’s advertising materials.The following year, the collection was further enriched with the Shiseido Advertising Art Exhibition organized by a Paris advertising art gallery. Shiseido’s design work was a unique visual expression of a hybrid between traditional Japanese culture, and French art nouveau and art deco, receiving praise from many French people.

Company cultural exhibitions were held thereafter such as “Paris-Tokyo-Paris Shiseido 1897-1997 La Beaute,” organized in 1997 by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, and “Face to Face: Shiseido and the Manufacture of Beauty, 1900-2000,” organized in 2000 by New York University’s Grey Art Gallery.

These activities have made Shiseido’s originality stand out and have contributed to the company’s prestige.

  • 1997: Corporate and Social Responsibilities introduced.

Announced ‘The Shiseido Way’ (corporate behavior) and announces ‘The Shiseido Code’ (corporate ethics and behavior standards). This has now been reintroduced in 2011 as the Shiseido Group Corporate Philosophy under the banner “Our Mission, Values and Way.”

  • Lisa Eldridge teamed up with Shiseido in 1998, working on a brand new make-up line, targeted specifically at the Asian market.
  • 2000: Holds Face to Face: Shiseido and the Manufacture of Beauty 1900-2000 Exhibition (Grey Art Gallery, New York University)
  • Online Archive of Shiseido Advertising

Sources:
Shiseido. (2016). History. Available: http://www.shiseidogroup.com/company/past/history/. Last accessed 11th January 2017.
Shiseido. (2016). History. Available: http://www.shiseidogroup.com/company/message/?rt_bt=menu-company-main_004. Last accessed 11th January 2017.
Weisenfield, G (2009). Visualising Culture; Selling Shiseido. Massachusetts: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. P.34-36.
Ashikari, M. (2005). Cultivating Japanese Whiteness. Journal of Material Culture. 10 (1), P. 75-6.

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Japanese Beauty: “Japanese Makeup Look, Haul and Chat” with Lisa Eldridge

I came across this video whilst researching Japanese Beauty Culture and views towards Makeup more in depth. I feel it is important to know as much as possible surrounding this subject area, before visiting Japan, and liaising with professionals and bloggers alike. I also want to be aware so I can compare cross-culturally in regards to the UK, for example, allowing to truly respond to my research topic.
I found this tutorial extremely informative in regards to the following:

  1. It is a makeup tutorial – a relatively new concept which has allowed bloggers in particular to engage socially on digital platforms, interacting with niche communities – however it is very informative and contextually sits perfectly within my research topic.
  2. Explores Japanese beauty trends and one of the ‘ideal’ makeup looks shaping Japaneseness and Japanese Identity for many.
  3. Lisa’s experience and knowledge on Japanese culture in relation to the beauty industry, leading to further research surrounding Shiseido in particular.
  4. Lisa was part of the team that helped create a new line for an Asian market, therefore being knowledgable on contrasts and similarities cross-culturally.

About Lisa:

  • “In 1998, Eldridge teamed up with Japanese make-up and skincare company Shiseido, who asked her to create a brand new make-up line for the Asian market.”
  • Eldridge is now Global Creative Director at Lancôme.

Key Points taken regarding Japanese Beauty, Culture, Tradition and Products:

  • Ideal base to makeup is ‘perfect’ pale skin, with no blemishes visible. Perfectly polished.
  • Foundation is worn that doesn’t leave too much shine on the skin.
  • Different sub-cultures will have different make-up trends, i.e. Harajuku.
  • Big eyes are popular – Anime influences, photo booths and apps available to achieve this when photographed. Also achieved with makeup; opening up the eyes with brush strokes, eyeshadow and eyeliner to rounded the eye.
  • False eyelashes are also huge in the consumer market, again allowing for eyes to be ‘larger’.
  • Brows are not so emphasised in Japan in contrast to the UK or more Western cultures, where there is a large emphasis on this trend, including, brow shape, brow routine and brow products/brands, for example.
  • Blusher has become more popular in the past 10 years.
  • ‘Contouring’ is not a huge trend in Japan, like Brows, opposed to in the UK/Western Countries currently.
  • Nudes, apricots and pale pink shades are favoured, or more often seen in Japan with many ‘looks’ and is seen as quite ‘glamourous’. Red lipstick is not seen as ‘glamourous’ in Japan, it is seen more as a traditional colour, and is said may only be worn with a Kimono for example, giving an example of cross-cultural differences. Red lipstick in the West can often be seen as provocative, for example.
  • Packaging is often ‘Kawaii’ (cute), reflecting again a different culture, whilst also reflecting the known Japanese trends of being youthful (many anti-ageing products on offer from both Japanese and Western brands).

Source:
Eldridge, L. (2015). Japanese Makeup Look, Haul and Chat – (and some BIG NEWS!). Available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj792rF713w. Last accessed 11th January 2017.
Unknown. (2017). Lisa Eldridge. Available: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Eldridge. Last accessed 11th January 2017.

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Japan Itinerary: 16th-23rd January 2017

I have compiled an itinerary for my research trip to Tokyo to ensure that I utilise my time and gain all of the necessary information required to write my dissertation and understand my research topic. I have found this to be a crucial to plan in such detail to ensure that travel runs smoothly, all places of interest (i.e. galleries) are covered, and that all meetings are attended. Forming a plan also allowed for me to see by ‘area’ what is ‘near by’, allowing to free up time on somedays and reconsolidate my initial itinerary to be more efficient.

I have another version of this itinerary with flight details, times, locations, meeting/interview information, and inner Tokyo travel routes which I will be using whilst in Tokyo, and will submit as a printed copy.

This is also working toward the following objectives:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

3. To work with and interview those both actively working in the Fashion and Beauty Industries, and those on a consumer/follower/user basis, to compare behaviours and perspectives in relation to body image and self-perceptions.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

MONDAY 16th

Travel to Japan (Full Day)

Train to Aiport
Fly to Tokyo
TUESDAY 17th
Arrive in Japan
Travel to Accommodation
Travel to Tokyo City
  • Travel and City Orientation
  • Food/Coffee Stop
  • Explore Local Area/Shops
  • Locate Local Galleries/Areas of Interest
  • Temple
Travel to Accommodation
WEDNESDAY 18th
Travel to Harajuku:
  • Meet a renowned Beauty Blogger for Beauty Shopping and Talk regarding Blogger Culture and Beauty in Harajuku
  • Walk through Omotesando on route to Harajuku
  • Explore Harajuku (LaForet Shopping Centre & LaForet Fashion Museum – Top Floor)
Travel to Accommodation
THURSDAY 19th
 
Travel to Ginza (Morning):
  • Travel from Ginza Station to Advertising Museum/Library Tokyo (Opens 11am)
  • Explore Ginza Shopping Area (Vivienne Westwood Red Label, Shiseido, Uniqlo – Open until 8pm)
  • Ginza Graphic Gallery (Time Permitting)
  • Matsuya Ginza (Shopping Centre)
Travel to Shinjuku (Afternoon):
  • Walk to Bunka Gaukuen Costume Musum (opens 10am)
  • Explore Local Area/Shops/Food (Vivienne Westwood Red Label)
Travel to Accommodation:
 
FRIDAY 20th
 
Travel to Shibuya
  • Walk to Vivienne Westwood Japan (and other ‘Designer stores’)
  • Travel to Meeting
  • Explore Shibuya Area
Travel to Accommodation
 
SATURDAY 21st
Disney Sea
SUNDAY 22nd
 
TBC
 
MONDAY 23rd
Travel to UK
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London Research Trip: Findings Mindmap

Below shows an overview of my research findings from my London research trip. In-depth notes have been made regarding the meeting with Toni Hollowood (separate blog post and included in appendices with audio recording), however the interview and findings with my model contact due to confidentiality agreements, will only be included in my appendices (with audio recording also).

In regards to the ‘Burberry’ and ‘Visual Research’ headings, these findings will be explored in Tokyo, Japan, off the back of this research trip in more detail, and will be discussed in conversation with Vogue, for example, whilst gaining comparative research (both contextual and visual).

This is also working toward the following objectives:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

3. To work with and interview those both actively working in the Fashion and Beauty Industries, and those on a consumer/follower/user basis, to compare behaviours and perspectives in relation to body image and self-perceptions.

london-mindmap

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