Japanese Beauty VS Western Beauty Mini-Mag/Zine/Trend Sourcebook: WIP V5

This is continuing to work towards Objective 4: To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

Below shows development for the cover for my beauty trend sourcebook.

I began experimenting with how I can bring both East and West elements together and found myself experimenting with the inner divider artwork created to separate the East and West side of the book, and began playing around with juxtaposing these together for the cover artwork.

Development is shown below exploring different typefaces for “meets” and “a sourcebook of beauty trends”, whilst also experimenting with different artwork and collages which have been created for the inner spreads, in order to give the reader a hint as to what is on the inner pages whilst also clearly showcasing a clear difference between both Eastern and Western beauty trends. Once I was happy with the developed cover, I then began experimenting with different background colours and how this would be executed to further add to the contrasting elements reflecting two different cultures. The “Eastern” section depicts a playful, childlike approach to design, whilst the “Western” sides depicts an affluent, luxurious quality. Both aim to reflect the spreads, content and their embodying cultures.

The cover would be used on both front and back, however the arrows would change direction depicting which way the book is to open in order to see Eastern or Western beauty trends.

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Japanese Beauty VS Western Beauty Mini-Mag/Zine/Trend Sourcebook: WIP V2

This is continuing to work towards Objective 4: To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

Below shows development of a range of digital collages and spreads which have been created for the East Meets West Beauty Trend Sourcebook.

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Above shows the ‘anti-aging/baby endorsed’ product page, inspired by my findings whilst researching in Japan. I wanted to relay how and why babies are often used to relay youthful skin, stemming from the obsession with everything child-like in Japan, and that child pornography was only banned in 2014. I feel this explains why such imagery is used so openly in Japanese culture and beauty products to relay ‘end-results’ being a norm opposed to a contrast of British/Western cultures. In addition, Western women are also often used to show how this relates back to the end-user, using babies as a signifier of ‘soft skin’.

Echoing the collage on the left, and the circular details stating “1”, “2” and “3” in Japanese, a circle has been used on the right hand side which will be used for copywriting to be over laid. I also found this was a different approach visually to the other Eastern pages whereby rectangles or squares have been used to hold the copy, whilst taking aesthetic inspiration from the packaging shown on the collage above, adding brand continuity and visual consistency to the spread.

Japanese numbers have been used in order to mimic that of a Japanese step-by-step guide, as most Japanese women expect to know how to use products, in what order and what they will achieve by doing so as previously discussed in my research in interviews and in regard to aesthetics and design. The above shows that with the 3 products, one can achieve such end results and have ‘baby-soft’ skin. By using a western female model, this allows also for the artwork to hint at self-perception issues of the Japanese women and target audience, whereby using such products will give lighter skin just like Western women, whilst also contrasting and complementing the Western baby used on the face mask packaging with blonde hair and blue eyes – a baby version of the adult on the right hand side.

The background texture has been inspired from the product packaging itself, emphasising a pink, youthful, feminine and playful aesthetic and tone. Polka dots and stars are often seen on packaging and promotional materials for the products of White Label by Cosme (the products shown above); examples of this can be seen below. In addition, blue has been used to complement the product packaging whilst not only stereotyping ‘girl babies’ – this is also reflected below.

I still feel that this particular spread needs work to be at a standard I am happy with and currently feel that there is too much going off on the page in regard to visual elements. I feel there needs to be more ‘balance’ between the two pages creating this particular spread, and that this will happen with development and feedback, as well as re-evaluation at a later date.

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Above shows the Kylie Cosmetics spread, showcasing a ‘get the look’ collage, using product photos from Kylie Jenner’s new ‘Valentines range’, allowing for one to achieve the associated look posted on her Instagram account. I feel that it is such social media and editorial spreads which allow for self perception issues to be highlighted, especially with the ease of purchasing and sourcing the exact products used to create this look. This allows for the end-user/consumer to buy not only into the brand but the ‘look’ itself, quite literally replicating the makeup shown with one feeling then as though they look just like her too due to having such products and information at hand. This hints at the idea of the gaze also, and how one can perceive what is seen on a photograph as ‘real’ (Rose), opposed to an edited, manipulated and filtered end-image, which has been constructed as a marketing tool for a particular brand and associated brand image (Tagg).

A mockup of the Instagram shot has been used highlighting social media in regard to self-perception issues, whilst the aesthetic and tone of the page is fitting with her Instagram feed, website and ‘colour scheme’ of the particular look, taking the lipstick shade as a key colour used throughout the spread for the arrows and text box shown on the left hand side.

Again I feel that this is a good starting point for the spread in regard to visuals, but that further work can be done to give this spread a clean and minimal aesthetic as denoted through Kylie’s website.

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A range of HQ images have been sourced and carefully cut out on Photoshop in order to build the digital collage shown above. I personally feel that this is one of the strongest collages created so far, and feel it sets a precedent for those to follow.

The above spread showcases the luxury cosmetics market in West, looking at how luxury design houses are competing with ‘true.cosmetics’ brands such as Rimmel, L’Oreal, Maybelline etc, to gain a share of the ever-growing market. High-end design houses such as YSL and Christian Louboutin for example, have adapted their brand representation into the world of cosmetics which allows for such companies to gain a share of the market place, whilst also giving the consumer a piece of affordable luxury, unlike the clothing and shoes aspect which normally only the ‘ universal elite’ (Bauman, 2004) can attain. This refers to the socialities, celebrities, bloggers and royalties od the world, whom shape trends and seasonal must-haves which others desire to have so badly in order to fit in and feel accepted, relating to Tajfel and Turners (1986) social identity theory. In addition, celebrities, or other ‘cultural icons’ are often the ‘face’ of such brands, so through clever marketing and advertising, one can purchase the same products used to create celebrity ‘looks’ to feel on a similar level, affecting self-perceptions knowingly or unknowingly.

This spread has been designed to reflect high-end, affluent luxury and adorned items, reflected by the products, artwork, aesthetic, tone and typography chosen. Each cosmetic product is cased in gold or silver, giving a ‘luxury’ and ‘expensive’ feel. This is echoed in the collage and artwork, using gold laced marble as a complementary element and using a sleek serif typeface. Red has been chosen as the key contrast colour, reflecting the product shade chosen and again this is echoed through the typeface chosen. Serif’s such as this are often seen in Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, denoting a certain aspirational lifestyle and movement one can only hope to attain and maintain. This is the opposite to that of Japanese magazines and products as seen on previous posts and throughout this post also, contrasting Japan’s youthful culture with that of the West, or UK’s high-end and more ‘European’, branded, designer tastes. Swatches of the cosmetics shades were also used to add a playful, yet aesthetically in-line twist to the spread. I have refrained from using illustrations or youthful elements to really highlight how affluent and luxurious this spread and trend is in Western culture.

I feel that this is one of the best collages created so far, due to being minimal, clean and aesthetically being very affluent and luxurious. It was important for me to keep this spread looking so, as I truly wanted this to contrast with the ‘Princess Kawaii’ spread in the Eastern half of the sourcebook.

 

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The above spread has been designed to reflect Decora beauty, a subculture derived in Harajuku, as a backlash to standardisation and conformation in Japan. This rebellion is a symbol for letting someone be who they are, and want to be, being reflected through colour, clothes and youthful style, opposed to being forced to conform to the ideals, norms and conventions of their modern society.

The Japanese proverb, “the nail that sticks out must be hammered in” comes into play here, noting that subcultures such as “Decora” are derived from a desire to be individual and have their own identity in a strict society where rules, standards and regulations take precedent; the opposite to Western cultures. This is reflected through the clothing, hairstyles and makeup trends shown on the left hand page of the spread above. Illustrations depicting a youthful, colourful notion inspired by the trends shown on the featured Decora girls. Elements of glitter, gemstones, jewels, makeup swatches and sweets have also been used in pastel colours also reflecting such visual Harajuku-led trends. The right hand page of the spread also shows this in a more structured manner, allowing for a title and bodycopy to be placed at a later date. It can also be noticed that the Dacora girls shown also have very pale, white washed skin using light makeup, echoing that of the skin-lightening trend; a broader trend seen across various age groups of women in Japan in an aim to look younger.

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Above shows development of the ‘male makeup artist’ page, using mockups of instagram photos taken from some of the most well know male beauty influencers currently on social media, Manny MUA (also discussed on a Maybelline post previously) and Patrick Starr, showcasing how social media has led to gender boundaries within the beauty industry to become blurred and non-stereotyped to females. I wanted to showcase this in the Western trends section as this is still not seen in Japan, and has helped for many males to be themselves, whilst also adding male perception issues to the mix in a similar light to females, with these influencers becoming icons in their own right. This has been discussed in my dissertation in relation to the alternate perspectives gained from my anonymous research questionnaire, whereby it was apparent that social media, filters, and image editing an affect male ideals within 18-24 year olds, as well as that of females.

Typography has been experimented with on the right looking at typeface, colour and layout. A peach colour was chosen to not be stereotypical of gender, i.e. pink – girl and blue – boy. Social media has removed these barriers, and this is what I wanted to show through the collage. Tags with social media handles will be applied to the imagery on the left hand side page, allowing for readers to directly relate to and have access to their social media platforms for reference, whilst acting as a citation of the image source at hand. By using mockups like on the Kylie Cosmetics spread, this highlights the power and use of social media within the beauty industry, whilst also reiterating how such MUAs have rose to fame in recent years.

A 8 x 8 grid system has been used for each spread throughout the sourcebook, and this is shown above, allowing for accurate, aligned and structured designs to be developed.

 

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The above spread shows development of the ABH (Anastasia Beverly Hills) spread, a brand and makeup artist whom has become a brand herself through an influx of social media trends and marketing strategies utilising some of the worlds most iconic celebrities, i.e. Kim Kardashian and Heidi Klum.

The spread and artwork has been designed using a feminine yet subtle colour palette, introducing makeup swatches inspired and influenced by the 3 key trends highlighted (contouring, brows and highlight; or ‘glow’), whilst promoting the brand ABH whom is the over arching leader of such trends in regard to product innovation and promotion.

These three trends are commonly seen on Instagram by social media communities, in particular celebrities, cultural icons, makeup artists, bloggers and vloggers, and in my opinion have shaped the content of social media in regard to what is considered ‘on trend’ within the beauty industry.

ABH is famous for using celebrities to originally promote her trends, products and techniques, whilst using social media as a marketing tool to promote the brand internationally. In the past year or so, these trends have taken off and have transformed the beauty industry into a modern day epidemic of striving to fit in and conform with such ideals and methods of beauty application, whilst also nspiring other makeup brands to broaden their product lines to gain a share of a demanded and popular market, i.e. L’Oreal have now released various brow products, highlighters and contour products which previously were not on their radar. Such trends have become the norm, with YouTubers and Instagram icons promoting such trends through photos and tutorials on a daily basis, allowing for a users and followers to also buy into such trends, becoming the everyday norm which one is expected to live up to, creating a new ‘ideal’ and in turn affecting self-perceptions of oneself an of other people.

Makeup swatches of the ABH products have been used throughout the spread, creating a reader association with the products themselves, whilst also adding a strong visual emphasis to the page and collage of the trends and products at hand.

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Above shows the pagination of the first draft of the book, alternating text pages on the right/left with digital collages on the opposite throughout, adding visual balance. In addition, it can also be seen the inner East and West divider pages showcasing the direction of the trends in the book. East has been placed on the right hand side denoting Japan’s location on the map, whilst Western trends on the left, denote the UKs location on the map in comparison to Japan. In addition, an intro page will be placed at the front and back of the book, so like a British or Japanese magazine, whichever way the book is opened the intro can be found. A cover will also be placed on the front and back, to add to the same vein, opposed to having a front cover and a back cover, the cover in place will have a dual purpose. This has been influenced from editorial and magazine left research in both the UK and Japan, whilst also reflecting the two contrasting cultures as much as possible.

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Refined Objectives for Semester 2

Following my research trip to Japan, I feel that my objectives have changed slightly, specifically relating to Objective 5:

  1. To derive a National or International Policy for use within the Fashion and Beauty Industries, based on collated research, interviews and experiences throughout this project.

In regard to this, I feel that from speaking with various models, bloggers and editors at Vogue Japan, that this objective will be extremely hard to produce after finding out that each country and subsequent culture, has a defined ‘ideal’ or body type, which would mean that standardisation on a International scale would be almost impossible. I m still interested in various policies surrounding this objective, but do not feel that this is the emphasis of my practice going forward, and feel my focus has shifted now towards making those interested in/active in the beauty/fashion industries of such different ideals, cultures and expectations opposed to trying to standardise them.

In addition, I also feel in regard to Objective 4 (noted below), that design work will now take a publishing based approach opposed to social media-led, due to research findings. Without both beauty/fashion cultures in the UK and in Japan being similar or comparative in regard to blogger culture, and social media use, and without an already existing large platform to work on that a digital campaign to highlight body image and self-perception issues, as suggested and experimented with in Semester 1 would not be viable. Instead, as noted above, I would like to produce a publication showcasing trends from both Western and Eastern cultures, particularly the UK and Japan, in order to highlight the differences between industries and how these themselves can impact upon self-perception and body image,

  1. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of Social Media and Magazines on self-perceptions and body image.

Therefore, the objectives which I will be working towards throughout Semester 2, can be found below:

Objectives and goals:

  1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

 

  1. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

 

  1.  To work with and interview those both actively working in the Fashion and Beauty Industries, and those on a consumer/follower/user basis, to compare behaviours and perspectives in relation to body image and self-perceptions.

 

  1. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

 

 

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Japanese Beauty VS Western Beauty Mini-Mag/Zine/Trend Sourcebook: WIP

This is continuing to work towards Objective 4: To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

For semester 2, in order to plan my practical project, I began by working from semester 3 backwards in order to realise my revised objectives, post research trip to Tokyo. For semester 3, for my final major practical project, I would like to produce a cross-cultural independent magazine, exploring cultural confluence in addition to contrasting cultures, ideals and trends across the fashion and beauty industries. I aim to pitch this as the first in a series of international cross-cultural editions, comparing different perspectives within this area.

Therefore for semester 2, I plan on producing a mini-independent magazine/zine/trend sourcebook prototype exploring cross-cultural and contrasting beauty trends, emphasising and raising awareness on the contrasts between the beauty industries in Japan, compared with the UK. This has been influenced by my primary research carried out in both the UK and Tokyo. Through the copywriting, I would also like to address issue relating to self-perception, however do not want to make this the main emphasis, as this will feed more into my semester 3 practical work when a magazine is designed using collated research from interviews in addition to theoretical research and perspectives collated throughout this semester.

I am considering the use of this publication, as a way of promoting the magazine which would be produced in semester 3, via information inside and perhaps a pull-out poster promoting the upcoming magazine. In addition, I would like to use this prototype to develop a clear understanding of whom the exact target audience will be for my final project. Time permitting, I will also consider promoting/sharing the publication digitally.

A digital version will allow for an international audience to be able to view and read the magazine opposed to being limited to ‘hand-out’, or ‘pick-up’ distribution methods for example – colleges/universities, independent book/magzine stores (i.e. The Village and Colours May Vary in Leeds), lectures, talks, events of relevance). By testing the magazine/zine as a prototype, this allows for distrubition methods and precise target audience to be considered, whilst enabling myself to see which methods generate the best response/reception.

As a prototype, I plan on exploring different binding, stocks, design-led and printing techniques during pre-production.

It will be informative via choice of editorial content, copywriting and design-led visuals. It will be aimed primarily at females between the ages of 18-24 whom have an interest of beauty and fashion (as noted above), in both the UK and in Japan to raise awareness of different beauty cultures and industries, however I would like to use this prototype to confirm this or negate this dependant on feedback and reception.

In addition, the prototype publication would also act as a source book for information regarding different Japanese trends and cultures.

In addition, by producing a prototype this will allow for any costs to be considered at this stage, which may alter/change print/binding, for example, moving forwards into semester 3.

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Above: Initial ideas for the full magazine, which will now be produced in semester 3. I have decided to produce this as my final major practical project, for various reasons:

  • Collaboration with both UK and Japanese bloggers
  • Sourcing Photography Online, in Books and Magazines, whilst sourcing Photographers and Models
  • Writing the Content and translating half to Japanese
  • Designing a magazine can take a long time, especially when working on a cross-cultural scale, as some content will need to be outsourced through collaboration
  • Print and production time/costs
  • Distribution methods can be tested to see whether physical routes are best, or whether digital outlets are better received – social media, magazine website/blog, for example.
  • Not all interviews/research has been completed and analysed
  • I want to show an emphasis on contrasting cultures and trends in semester 2 and in turn how this affects perceptions and ideals

By working on a smaller scale initially, this will allow me to prototype a mini-mag/zine, which will allow for any problems which may arise to be alleviated prior to working on the final outcome, enabling a smooth and straight forward process in Semester 3.

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Above shows planning and idea development for the different spreads of the Japanese pages and Western pages, specifically looking at which trends should be translated into artwork. Not all of these will be used however by creating a list based on visual research I have collated it enabled me to make a start on the practical elements. In addition, lists of brands to look at/collect imagery for per spread were written as shown above. Again this was created through going through visual research and magazines collected in both the UK and in Japan.

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Above shows development of the “kawaii” or “cute” theme derived in Japan, focusing on a youthful culture who still want to capture their childhood through their choice of playful product. In addition, these Korean inspired products are seen all around Japanese drug stores and high-end stores as seen in visual research collected from my Japan trip. Similar to Harajuku subcultures such as Dacora, this is a rebellion and reaction to conformation and standardisation in Japan, and by buying into these form of products, one is seen to have an individual identity opposed to a controlled identity, which I feel is important in regard to self-perception and relaying this to a Western audience, whereby one can be who they want to be generally without any questions being asked or external socio-cultural pressures.

Aesthetic influences have been taken from the local and national magazines noted on my blog, which were collected in Japan, whilst taking into account other aesthetic influences from collage artists, also previously discussed on my blog. It was important to get across a cute, youthful and playful element in the spread whilst taking influences from the product packaging and brands used themselves, i.e. diamonds inspired by Jill Sander and Kittens inspired by Paul and Joe, and CanMake – seen in photos of beauty products/packaging/pos collated in Japan and noted on a previous post also.

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Above shows the development of the skin-lightening trend collage and spread, showcasing the beauty trend which is most predominant in Japanese culture, and can be seen in examples of beauty products and in magazines collated in Japan. Even though Japanese skin-lightening trends stem from socio-cultural and historical traits there is an underlying modern influence from Western ideals, global consumerism and brand standardisation which comes into play making this trend very diverse and multi-contextual. The spreads showcase this through showing a range of ‘international’ and ‘Japanese’ brands which have adapted their product ranges to such trends, whilst showing a range of stereotypical images of youthful looking, light skinned Japanese women denoting their ‘ideal’. This spread explores how such trends can influences ones self-perception of self-hood and self-worth, whilst taking aesthetic influences from Japanese local and national magazines. This is a theme which has been discussed in depth in my dissertation due to having such a contrasting ‘ideal’ to that of Western women wanting to be tanned in order to represent affluence – in Japanese culture, the lighter the skin tone, the richer you are, the darker the skin tone, the poorer you are; relating back to historical working classes, aristocracy and the era of the Geisha.

This also relates back to various theoretical perspectives and studies relating to Japanese culture, as carried out by Shiseido and discussed on my blog for example, as well as in my dissertation. Light make-up and youthful, light skin are seen as favourable and this is what is represented in the ideal above. The lighter the skin, the younger it is also said to look (Tagal, et al. 2016).

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Above shows the development of the Kylie Cosmetics “get the look” artwork, which has been discussed in depth on another blog post analysing this development and design in detail.
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Above shows the ‘anti-aging/baby endorsed’ product page, inspired by my findings whilst researching in Japan. I wanted to relay how and why babies are often used to relay youthful skin, stemming from the obsession with everything child-like in Japan, and that child pornography was only banned in 2014. I feel this explains why such imagery is used so openly in Japanese culture and beauty products to relay ‘end-results’ being a norm opposed to a contrast of British/Western cultures. In addition, Western women are also often used to show how this relates back to the end-user, using babies as a signifier of ‘soft skin’.

The background texture has been inspired from the product packaging itself, emphasising a pink, youthful, feminine and playful aesthetic and tone. Polka dots and stars are often seen on packaging and promotional materials for the products of White Label by Cosme (the products shown above); examples of this can be seen below. In addition, blue has been used to complement the product packaging whilst not only stereotyping ‘girl babies’ – this is also reflected below. Japanese numbers have been used in order to mimic that of a Japanese step-by-step guide, as most Japanese women expect to know how to use products, in what order and what they will achieve by doing so as previously discussed in my research in interviews and in regard to aesthetics and design. The above shows that with the 3 products, one can achieve such end results and have ‘baby-soft’ skin. By using a western female model, this allows also for the artwork to hint at self-perception issues of the Japanese women and target audience, whereby using such products will give lighter skin just like Western women, whilst also contrasting and complementing the Western baby used on the face mask packaging with blonde hair and blue eyes – a baby version of the adult on the right hand side.

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Sourcebook Aesthetic/Visual Inspiration

This is working towards the following objectives:

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

 

80s Fashion | A Decade of Trends by Danielle Muntyan

This magazine has been produced and published as a source book of 80s fashion trends and history.

Designed in mind for fashion students and fashionista’s, it contains everything you need to know about the influential decade; history, social issues, cultural changes and influential icons who shapes the fashion industry at the time.

96 pages / Perfect Bound / Matte Cover / Gloss Inners

Available at: http://daniellemuntyandesign.dunked.com/80s-fashion-a-decade-of-trends

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Zuni Creates

A range of fashion digital and print-led collage and editorial works.

Available at: http://www.zukii.uk/company-magazine

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A-Collage

A range of socio-cultural led digital and print-led collages, hinting at identity issues and cultural confluence.

Available at: http://www.a-collage.com

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Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: Beauty Store/Product Photos

Below shows a large range of different photos taken whilst in beauty stores, exploring a range of trends, models and packaging for example, in order to gain a true sense of what is on offer in Japan in regards to culture and trends, allowing for a comparison with British products and brands alike.

This is also working toward the following objective:

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

Notes have been made below in regard to my findings.

A Japanese model can be seen below advertising a Japanese cosmetics brand, however has lighter skin than the average Japanese woman, and also has blue eyes using contact lenses to both enlarge, and maintain a Western look which can be portrayed to the consumer – with these products and this ‘look’ you could also look more Western.

Again a model with extremely light skin has been used to advertise ‘looks’ created by particular products – this is enforced with a step-by-step guide as seen in many Japanese magazines (discussed on another blog post in more depth).

Western models used to advertise products to remove underarm hair.

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Above shows a ‘The Collagen” drink, produced, sold and branded by Shiseido. These drinks claim to stimulate the production of more collagen in the skin, allowing for a more youthful look overtime, feeding the Japanese obsession with looking and feeling young. There are other forms of Anti-Ageing products available in this manner also from different brands, as well as collagen tablets from Shiseido. In addition, it is also possible to buy tablets which slowly lighten the skin with regular use.

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Above shows a range of lipcare products which feature Western babies in place of female models. I found this fascinating and shocking, as child pornography was only banned in Japan 2 years ago, and feel in the UK this would be absolutely not acceptable. The copywriting also used – “deep moist” and “juicy” also rings sexual connotations which I find disturbing. Nicole, the beauty blogger, whom took me on this shopping trip in Harajuku, explained the reasoning is because they want youthful, ‘baby soft’ skin and lips – the same marketing strategy is also used with face masks (images shown further down this blog post).

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Majolica Menorca is a Japanese cosmetics brand that can be found in drugstores around the city. I noticed with a range of National brands, that unlike here in the UK, the product design and packaging is often ‘cute’, ‘cheap’ and somewhat ‘tacky’ appealing to a young audience.

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The above shows a range of light skinned models promoting a Japanese cosmetics range.

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Above shows an advert for a ‘sticky pix’ photo booth, whereby images are taken and digitally edited before printing. This particular photo booth makes the participant appear more doll like, i.e. Barbie as seen here.

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The above false eye lash companies have used a range of fair haired and light skinned Japanese models, which resemble a Western look which is often desired amongst young women in Japan; these are not natural hair colours for Japanese people and therefore aim to achieve a more Western look.

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Above shows again the cute, kawaii, aesthetic often used in Japan for cosmetic packaging, here using a cat on the POS reflecting a kitten theme cosmetic range appealing to a young female audience.

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POS displays showcasing step by step and how to achieve the look guides as often seen in Japanese magazines. Japanese women feel the need to know outcome will be seen with the product at hand before purchase.

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L’oreal in Japan, a European cosmetics brand, even in Japan uses mainly Western models to promote the brand. I did find however that a different product range is available utilising more lip glosses and stains than lipsticks, and a larger range of face powders, BB creams and CC creams, opposed to heavy foundations as seen in the UK.

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Contact lenses in a range of colours and styles can be purchased off the counter in order to achieve bigger eyes like that seen in Western people. This is denoted in the pictures used on the POS.

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Again babies are often used to promote youthful, baby skin and baby soft lips. I feel that this extreme is still seen as okay in Japan due to child pornography only being made illegal and punishable in 2014. In addition, the babies used on the product packaging are always Western babies, not Japanese.

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Western looking Japanese models are often used denoting the classic stereotypical Western look – blonde hair and big eyes. Makeup and contact lenses are used to achieve this look, along with hair dye. The model used here is a famous Japanese model whom is half English.

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As above, very Western looking Japanese models are often used denoting the classic stereotypical Western look – blonde hair and big eyes. Makeup and contact lenses are used to achieve this look, along with hair dye. The model used here is a famous Japanese model whom is half English.

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A range of ‘mouth pieces’ can be bought in Japanese drug stores, designed to give a more Western look. These are designed to overtime change the shape of the lips. Mainly Western models are used again, along with how-to guides.

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Above; a wide range of skin-lightening skincare products and cosmetics, including s placenta based range. This is popular in Japan due to scientifically being proven to give anti-aging skin.

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Above shows a range of beauty and fashion advertisements/promotions, all of which feature Western models and icons. The brands that are shown are all known to be European brands, and use the same models as in European/Western countries in order to maintain International brand image and reputation.

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Above and below; a range of skin-lightening and whitening cosmetics from MAC Cosmetics, which are not available to buy in the UK. International brands have started to cater for Japanese audiences and trends, this is the same as Chanel Cosmetics, Dior Cosmetics and YSL Beauty, for example.

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Above; Shu Umera; a Japanese cosmetics brand promoted via the use of Western models featuring different ‘looks’. A range of 4D skin lightening products are also available to buy, which are not available at concessions in the UK.

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Western icon Natalie Portman is shown above modelling for Dior to maintain an International standard of advertising and marketing for the brand, whilst keeping in line with the International brand image.

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Above; another Western baby is used for the promotion of a moisturising lipstick, however this time the baby features blonde hair and big blue eyes – desired looks in a Westerner, or Gaijin to the Japanese.

 

 

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Above shows a range of placenta based skin-lightening products used for ‘anti-aging’.

 

 

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Above; a baby again is used to promote placenta based products, however this time a Japanese baby is used in contrast to the other products noted.

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Above shows a wide range of skin lightening products available in a Japanese drug store. On the POS a very fair skinned Japanese model is used with white hair, in order to promote a series of skin bleaching products.

 

No self-tanning products were available at all to buy in Japan. When asked in stores if such products were available, 99% of consultants did not know what this was, or was for. And when explained, found this fascinating in relation to their culture and fascination of skin-lightening and anti-tanning.

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Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: Local Promotional Collateral

Below shows a range of scans and photographs of locally produced and printed beauty magazines which I picked up across Tokyo on my research trip to Japan.

I have chosen to document the following due to aesthetic design choices, to aid my practical work, whilst also documenting a range of skin-lightening products, adverts and step-by-step tutorials as noted across many different local and national Japanese magazines. In addition, I also found interesting that regardless of product or brand, young models with fairly light skin have been used, promoting the Japanese ‘ideal’. Emphasis in Japan is primarily on youthfulness opposed to being ‘skinny’ and losing weight/gym going as often seen in the UK at the moment across magazines and social media.

This is also working toward the following objective:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

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In addition, I also found the above two images interesting – one is a range of scanned in leaflets for a range of brands and products – all featuring light-skinned, very youthful models as well as noting that luxury brands, such as Chanel are using Western models in Japan to promote their products. The second image, is a photograph taken in Ginza station, whereby a cosmetic surgery clinic advertisement is shown, featuring all Japanese text and a Western model with blonde hair, and blue eyes – not a Japanese lady. This enforces the idea that having surgery could make you look Western as the model seen by having the work done highlighted with illustrations.

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Japan Research Trip – Collated Research: National Magazines

Below shows a range of scanned in spreads and magazine covers from a range of National Japanese Fashion and Beauty magazines which I purchased during my research trip to Tokyo. I picked these up due to having a different angle in regard to both content and design, to that of Vogue magazine and Harpers Bazaar. In addition, I also found these to be great visual references and inspirations in regard to aesthetics and design choices, with a range of colour, typography and layout being used, giving each a distinct ‘Japanese’ tone, opposed to being more ‘Westernised’ as seen across Vogue, for example.

Unlike the Vogue and Harpers Bazaar, these magazines have around 90% Japanese led content. This includes, models, advertisements, brands noted and editorial content. However, similarly to Vogue, magazines such as ViVi and Nylon still use English for their main headlines, allowing ‘Gajins’ or ‘foreigners’ to still relate, and understand the article at hand even without reading the full body of text.

Also shown is a magazine, Maquia, which is entirely based on beauty – no magazines of this nature are available in the UK, and shows how big the beauty industry is in Japan in relation to at home. Within the magazine is a combination of both Japanese and Western brands, however featured are ONLY Japanese models, opposed to a combination, or a predominant Western influence. Step-by-step guides are heavily seen through Maquia, and other magazines such as Ginza, which allow consumers to understand how to use products and what the outcome will be – this was discussed on a previous blog post, as well as being discussed heavily with both Nicole Takahashi (beauty blogger) and Vogue Japan in different interviews during my time in Tokyo.

I have noted on a previous post, that Japanese women want to look youthful, and this is reflected through the aesthetic design choices, including elements of collage and typography, as well as having a playful and energetic approach to the layout design. I find these magazines extremely inspiring and hope to channel this aesthetic into my practical work throughout this semester and going forward also. British magazines tend to be affluent in design, being more stripped back, whilst these particular examples show an influx of products, and design direction, which really differentiate the two cultures which I am researching into comparative nature.

This is also working toward the following objective:

1. To understand the ways in which Social Media and Magazines can affect self-perceptions and issues:

A) With body image (Females, 18-24)

B) With body image on a cross-cultural scale (Females, 18-24; Tokyo, Japan).

2. To understand policies and guidelines within the Fashion and Beauty Industries currently encouraging positive body image.

4. To prototype a range of design work targeted at 18-24 year old women, highlighting impacts of cross-cultural beauty/fashion trends on self-perceptions and body image.

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