Article: “Social Media May Lead Women To Self-Objectify Their Own Body”

Below shows extracts taken from the article, “Social Media May Lead Women To Self-Objectify Their Own Body” which I feel are extremely relevant and resonant to my current practice, and research question, whilst also being inline with my Social Media Wellbeing Campaign in regards to how this growing form of immediate interaction with the fashion and beauty industries is affecting our self-perception and ideals of body image.

I found that not only did this resonate with my current research and practice, but also backed up my working research question in regards to evidencing that social media and manipulated images, for example, are one of the reasons why our self-perceptions are distorted overtime leading to negative and comparative behaviours, as well as a range of mental illnesses.

This particular quote really stood out to me in relation to the Self-Surveying Gaze theory as noted by Fredrickon and Roberts (2008) which I have also just been researching in relation to my research question and practice; “When a person  compares their own inner or self image to an image  that has been filtered on social media it can pose the threat  to self objectification and self absorption. When self comparisons take place that person looks at themselves as the spectator or observer.” ( Slater and Tiggemann (2015)  I found this extremely resonant due to the associated within self-comparisons (and the self-gaze) allowing for one to almost become the observer through their eyes therefore acting in anticipation or of expectation of pre-meditated ideals.

I was also taken by the amount of time on average it is said most women spend on Facebook a day – 2 hours. This may not necessarily be at once, however is still a considerable amount of time a day on one social media platform/app alone, therefore disregarding Instagram and Twitter for example from this figure, showing how much time can be spent online via a phone, tablet, computer or even a smart TV. For me, this evidences how our self-perceptions can be altered sub-consciously through continuous streams of edited, manipulated and curated media.

Sage Journal, “Psychology of Women Quarterly”, Psychologist: Jasmine Fardouly:

“Given the large number of images posted to Facebook (currently over 250 billion images; Facebook, 2013), as well as the appearance-related comments they often receive from others, Facebook may well be considered an appearance-focused media type.”

“Alone women spend an average of 2 hours a day on Facebook.”

“Researchers  Slater and Tiggemann (2015) found that the amount of time spent on social networks was associated with greater self-objectification. Women have a long history of being objectified in the media from television, music videos, and print magazines, why would the objectification just stop at these mediums and not social media? And why are women self objectifying themselves? Some can argue  low self esteem, vanity, or insecurities. Women have been known to compare themselves to other women, whether short, skinny, tall, plus size, short hair or long hair. It’s just something women do—that is—label themselves in comparison to others. When a person  compares their own inner or self image to an image  that has been filtered on social media it can pose the threat  to self objectification and self absorption. When self comparisons take place that person looks at themselves as the spectator or observer.”

“Self-comparisons to images of a previous self might engender a greater focus on specific body parts, also contributing to self-objectification.””

Original Sources:

Author  Rick Nauert PhD, Young Women Compare Themselves on Social Media”

Author Rebecca Adams The Huffington Post “How Facebook Stalking Could Lead Women To Objectify Their Own Bodies”

Fardouly, J., Diedrichs, P.C., Vartanian, L.R., Halliwell, E. (2015). ‘The Mediating Role of Appearance Comparisons in the Relationship Between Media Usage and Self-Objectification in Young Women’, Psychology of Women Quarterly, Sage Journal , p 34 doi: 10.1177/036168431558184

Article Source:
Inside The Girls Room. (2015). Social Media May Lead Women to Objectify Their Own Body. Available: https://insidethegirlsroom.com/2015/04/22/social-media-may-lead-women-to-objectify-their-own-body/. Last accessed 13th November 2016.